In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton:

Ross Sea, Antarctica

In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton: Ross Sea, Antarctica

DAYS 30 / SHIP Akademik Shokalskiy / Spirit of Enderby

DEPARTURES 8 JAN 2020 / 10 JAN 2020 / 8 FEB 2020 / 13 JAN 2021 / 11 FEB 2021

PLACES VISITED The Snares / Macquarie Island / The Ross Sea / Campbell Island / Auckland Islands

PRICES FROM $23,000 USD (More Rates)

The Ross Sea region of Antarctica is one of the most remote places on Planet Earth and one of the most fascinating places in the continent's human history. With shipping restricted by impenetrable pack ice to just two brief months each austral summer, few people have ever visited this strange and beautiful territory, with opportunities for non-scientific personnel limited to a handful of tourist expedition ships. Heritage Expeditions offers such a voyage on its own fully equipped and ice-strengthened ship Spirit of Enderby, crewed by some of the most experienced officers and sailors in the world and staffed by a passionate and knowledgeable expedition team. This is a unique opportunity to experience nature on a scale so grand there are no words to describe it.

The Ross Sea takes its name from Sir James Clark Ross who discovered it in 1841. The British Royal Geographical Society chose the Ross Sea for the now famous British National Antarctic Expedition in 1901-04 led by Robert Falcon Scott. That one expedition spawned what is sometimes referred to as the 'Race to the Pole'. Ernest Shackleton almost succeeded in 1907-09 and the Japanese explorer Nobu Shirase tried in 1910-12. Scott thought it was his, but was beaten by his rival, Norwegian Roald Amundsen in the summer of 1911. Shackleton's Trans-Antarctic expedition in 1914-17 marked the end of this 'heroic' or 'golden age' of exploration, but many of the relics of this era, including some huts, remain. The dramatic landscape described by these early explorers is unchanged. Mt Erebus, Mt Discovery and the Transantarctic Mountains are as inspiring today as they were 100 years ago. The penguin rookeries described by the early biologists fluctuate in numbers from year to year, but they still occupy the same sites. The seals, which are no longer hunted for food lie around on ice floes seemingly unperturbed. The whales, which were hunted so ruthlessly here in the 1920s, are slowly coming back, but it is a long way back from the edge of extinction, and some species have done better than others. Snow Petrels, Wilson's Storm-Petrels, Antarctic Prions and South Polar Skuas all breed in this seemingly inhospitable environment.

There is so much to do and so much to see here, from exploring historic huts and sites to visiting penguin rookeries, marvelling at the glacial ice tongues and ice shelves, and understanding the icebergs and sea ice. Then there are all the seabirds, seals and whales to observe and photograph, modern scientific bases and field camps to visit and simply the opportunity to spend time drinking in the marvellous landscape that has always enthralled visitors.

Lying like stepping stones to the Antarctic continent are the little known Subantarctic Islands. Our journey also includes The Snares, Auckland, Macquarie and Campbell Island. They break our long journey, but more importantly, they help prepare us for what lies ahead, for these islands are part of the amazing and dynamic Southern Ocean ecosystem of which Antarctica is at the very heart. It is the powerhouse which drives this ecosystem upon which the world depends.

 

The Ross Sea region of Antarctica is one of the most remote places on Planet Earth and one of the most fascinating places in the continent's human history. With shipping restricted by impenetrable pack ice to just two brief months each austral summer, few people have ever visited this strange and beautiful territory, with opportunities for non-scientific personnel limited to a handful of tourist expedition ships. Heritage Expeditions offers such a voyage on its own fully equipped and ice-strengthened ship Spirit of Enderby, crewed by some of the most experienced officers and sailors in the world and staffed by a passionate and knowledgeable expedition team. This is a unique opportunity to experience nature on a scale so grand there are no words to describe it.

The Ross Sea takes its name from Sir James Clark Ross who discovered it in 1841. The British Royal Geographical Society chose the Ross Sea for the now famous British National Antarctic Expedition in 1901-04 led by Robert Falcon Scott. That one expedition spawned what is sometimes referred to as the 'Race to the Pole'. Ernest Shackleton almost succeeded in 1907-09 and the Japanese explorer Nobu Shirase tried in 1910-12. Scott thought it was his, but was beaten by his rival, Norwegian Roald Amundsen in the summer of 1911. Shackleton's Trans-Antarctic expedition in 1914-17 marked the end of this 'heroic' or 'golden age' of exploration, but many of the relics of this era, including some huts, remain. The dramatic landscape described by these early explorers is unchanged. Mt Erebus, Mt Discovery and the Transantarctic Mountains are as inspiring today as they were 100 years ago. The penguin rookeries described by the early biologists fluctuate in numbers from year to year, but they still occupy the same sites. The seals, which are no longer hunted for food lie around on ice floes seemingly unperturbed. The whales, which were hunted so ruthlessly here in the 1920s, are slowly coming back, but it is a long way back from the edge of extinction, and some species have done better than others. Snow Petrels, Wilson's Storm-Petrels, Antarctic Prions and South Polar Skuas all breed in this seemingly inhospitable environment.

There is so much to do and so much to see here, from exploring historic huts and sites to visiting penguin rookeries, marvelling at the glacial ice tongues and ice shelves, and understanding the icebergs and sea ice. Then there are all the seabirds, seals and whales to observe and photograph, modern scientific bases and field camps to visit and simply the opportunity to spend time drinking in the marvellous landscape that has always enthralled visitors.

Lying like stepping stones to the Antarctic continent are the little known Subantarctic Islands. Our journey also includes The Snares, Auckland, Macquarie and Campbell Island. They break our long journey, but more importantly, they help prepare us for what lies ahead, for these islands are part of the amazing and dynamic Southern Ocean ecosystem of which Antarctica is at the very heart. It is the powerhouse which drives this ecosystem upon which the world depends.

 

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2019 ITINERARY
In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton: Ross Sea, Antarctica
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Day 1: Invercargill
Arrive at Invercargill, New Zealand’s southern most city and rich in Scottish history. Grab your last-minute luxuries before meeting your fellow expeditioners for an informal get-together over dinner.

Day 2: Port of Bluff
Enjoy breakfast at the hotel restaurant and exploring some of the local attractions before heading to the Port of Bluff, where you will board Spirit of Enderby. Settle into your cabin and join your expedition team and the captain for a welcome on board.

Day 3: At Sea
Take the chance to learn more about the biology and history of these islands and the tempestuous Southern Ocean through informal lectures with our experts. This particular stretch of ocean is very productive and we can expect many seabirds, including five or six kinds of albatross and numerous species of petrel.

Days 4 to 5: Auckland Islands
Characterised by towering cliffs and rugged sea stacks, these islands have borne witness to many a shipwreck in days gone by. We spend the day ashore on Enderby Island which is, perhaps, the most beautiful of all the Subantarctic Islands. Here we find parakeets flitting above carpets of red, white and yellow wild flowers and on the beaches beyond, the rare Hooker’s, or New Zealand, Sea Lion. We land in Carnley Harbour and if conditions are suitable, climb to a Shy Albatross colony, otherwise we will explore sites within the harbour.

Day 6: At Sea
Take the chance to learn more about the biology and history of these islands and the tempestuous Southern Ocean through informal lectures with our experts. This particular stretch of ocean is very productive and we can expect many seabirds, including five or six kinds of albatross and numerous species of petrel.

Days 7 to 8: Macquarie Island
This remote, rocky outpost which endures roaring westerly winds supports one of the highest concentrations of wildlife in the Southern Hemisphere. Four species of penguin; King, Royal, Rockhopper and Gentoo all breed here. You will never forget your first experience in a ceaselessly active ‘penguin city’, where the dapper inhabitants show no fear of their strange visitors. We will also meet with the Park Rangers, visit the Australian Antarctic Base and observe the hundreds of Southern Elephant Seals along the beaches.

Days 9 to 12: At Sea
Soaring albatross and petrels circle the vessel as we steam south through the Southern Ocean. Lectures now concentrate on the Ross Sea region and beyond the bow of the ship; drifting icebergs of extraordinary shapes begin to appear. Manoeuvring in close for your first ice photographs we pass the Antarctic Circle and into the continent’s realm of 24-hour daylight.

Days 13 to 22: Antarctica’s Ross Sea Region
With unpredictable ice and weather conditions, a day-by-day itinerary is not possible, but we assess the conditions daily and take every opportunity to make landings and launch the Zodiacs. You can anticipate wildlife viewing, visits to scientific bases and historic sites, as well as the spectacular white and blue scenery. We hope to visit the following areas: Cape Adare: A large flat spit of land, teeming with the staggering sight of Antarctica’s largest Adelie Penguin rookery: a tumult of chattering, feeding chicks, territorial disputes, petty pilfering and courtship displays. Curious penguins often come very close, offering superb photographic opportunities. Among the shifting mass of penguins we will find Carsten Borchgrevink’s Hut, the oldest in Antarctica, an overwintering shelter for the first expedition to the continent in 1899. Cape Hallett: The enormous Admiralty Range heralds our arrival; wild and extraordinary, the mountains rear up towering out of the sea to over 4,000-metres high and are bounded by colossal glaciers. We make our landing at an abandoned base site, now home to large numbers of Adelie Penguins and Weddell Seals. Franklin Island: Desolately beautiful and rugged, this is home to a large Adelie Penguin population and other nesting seabirds. We attempt a landing and explore the coastline. Possession Islands: Rarely-visited, small and rugged, these rocks support tens of thousands of penguins. Observe the birds’ busy and humorous activity, with the Admiralty Mountains forming a superb backdrop across the water. Ross Ice Shelf: The world’s largest body of floating ice and a natural barrier, at times creating hazardous weather, with sheets of snow blown at gale force by winds off the polar ice cap. Just 800 miles from the South Pole, this daunting spectacle prevented many early explorers from venturing further south. We cruise along its dizzying 30-metre high ice cliffs, perhaps lucky enough to see icebergs ‘calving’. Ross Island: Mount Erebus/Cape Bird/Shackleton’s Hut/Scott’s Hut(s) and visits to a scientific field station (Scott and McMurdo Stations are high on our wish list but ice, weather and station operational requirements often make them inaccessible). Ross Island was, and is, the ‘hub of activity’ in the Ross Sea, dominated by Mt Erebus, a monstrous active volcano named after the ancient Greek God of Darkness. The carefully preserved huts of the ‘Heroic Era’ help make the history come alive. If we can reach the bases, we will get a modern perspective on Antarctic Research. Terra Nova Bay: An Italian research station where the scientists are always hospitable and enjoy showing us around their lonely but beautiful home. They share with us their scientific research and also, perhaps, the best ‘espresso’ in Antarctica!

Days 23 to 25: At Sea
Taking time to rest and enjoy life on board Spirit of Enderby in the bar or library after the excitement and long daylight hours of the Antarctic, we have time for lectures on our final destination and for some pelagic bird spotting.

Days 26 to 27: Campbell Island – Perseverance Harbour
We drop anchor in Perseverance Harbour, an occasional refuge for Southern Right Whales who come here to calve. Walk to the nesting site of the Southern Royal Albatross and see the strange and beautiful megaherbs on the hills. These huge wild flowers that have adapted to the harsh conditions have unusual colourings and weirdly-shaped leaves. We also seek out other wildlife such as Campbell Island Shags, Light-mantled Sooty Albatross and sea lions.

Days 28 to 29: At Sea
Relax and reflect on a remarkable journey as you join our experts for a recap of highlights and enjoy a farewell dinner this evening.

Day 30: Christchurch
We disembark in the Port of Lyttelton and this adventure ends as we disperse to begin others. After fond farewells we transfer you to central city hotels or to the airport. Enquire for a full itinerary and/or a Bird and Mammal List.

Our ship: Akademik Shokalskiy

Akademik Shokalskiy is the sister ship to the Spirit of Enderby (Professor Khromov). They were both built in 1984 for polar and oceanographic research and, being fully ice-strengthened, they are perfect for expedition travel. She carries just 50 passengers and provides comfortable accommodation in twin share cabins approximately half of which have private facilities. All cabins have outsid...

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Our ship: Spirit of Enderby

The Spirit of Enderby (Professor Khromov) is a fully ice-strengthened expedition vessel, built in 1984 for polar and oceanographic research and is perfect for Expedition Travel. She carries just 50 passengers and was refurbished in May 2019 to provide comfortable accommodation in twin share cabins approximately half of which have private facilities. All cabins have outside windows o...

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Pricing

In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton - 8 Jan 2020 - Akademik Shokalskiy

Cabin Category Price USD Description Availablity
Main Deck $23,000 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private washbasin. Shared shower and toilet facilities nearby with other Main Deck cabins. These cabins have a porthole. Waitlisted
Superior $25,000 One bunk (one upper and one lower berth), writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Waitlisted
Superior Plus $28,300 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Available
Mini Suite $29,400 Separate bedroom with a double bed and a single bed or sofa in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Mini Suites have windows. Available
Heritage Suite $32,000 Large lounge area, separate bedroom with double bed, single bed in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe, drawers, and fridge. There is a private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Large forward and side facing windows with great views. Waitlisted
Additional fees

Landing Fees (per person in USD): $880.00pp

Includes:

Pre/Post cruise transfers, one night hotel accommodation in a twin share room (incl. dinner/breakfast), all on board ship accommodation with meals and all expedition shore excursions.

Excludes:

All items of a personal nature, laundry, drinks, gratuities. International/domestic flights, visas and travel insurance.

In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton - 10 Jan 2020 - Spirit of Enderby

Cabin Category Price USD Description Availablity
Main Deck $23,000 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private washbasin. Shared shower and toilet facilities nearby with other Main Deck cabins. These cabins have a porthole. Limited
Superior $25,000 One bunk (one upper and one lower berth), writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Waitlisted
Superior Plus $28,300 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Available
Mini Suite $29,400 Separate bedroom with a double bed and a single bed or sofa in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Mini Suites have windows. Waitlisted
Heritage Suite $32,000 Large lounge area, separate bedroom with double bed, single bed in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe, drawers, and fridge. There is a private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Large forward and side facing windows with great views. Waitlisted
Additional fees

Landing Fees (per person in USD): $880.00pp

Includes:

Pre/Post cruise transfers, one night hotel accommodation in a twin share room (incl. dinner/breakfast), all on board ship accommodation with meals and all expedition shore excursions.

Excludes:

All items of a personal nature, laundry, drinks, gratuities. International/domestic flights, visas and travel insurance.

In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton - 8 Feb 2020 - Spirit of Enderby

Cabin Category Price USD Description Availablity
Main Deck $23,000 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private washbasin. Shared shower and toilet facilities nearby with other Main Deck cabins. These cabins have a porthole. Waitlisted
Superior $25,000 One bunk (one upper and one lower berth), writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Waitlisted
Superior Plus $28,300 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Waitlisted
Mini Suite $29,400 Separate bedroom with a double bed and a single bed or sofa in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Mini Suites have windows. Waitlisted
Heritage Suite $32,000 Large lounge area, separate bedroom with double bed, single bed in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe, drawers, and fridge. There is a private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Large forward and side facing windows with great views. Waitlisted
Additional fees

Landing Fees (per person in USD): $880.00pp

Includes:

Pre/Post cruise transfers, one night hotel accommodation in a twin share room (incl. dinner/breakfast), all on board ship accommodation with meals and all expedition shore excursions.

Excludes:

All items of a personal nature, laundry, drinks, gratuities. International/domestic flights, visas and travel insurance.

In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton - 13 Jan 2021 - Spirit of Enderby

Cabin Category Price USD Description Availablity
Main Deck $23,000 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private washbasin. Shared shower and toilet facilities nearby with other Main Deck cabins. These cabins have a porthole. Available
Superior $25,000 One bunk (one upper and one lower berth), writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Available
Superior Plus $28,300 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Available
Mini Suite $29,400 Separate bedroom with a double bed and a single bed or sofa in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Mini Suites have windows. Waitlisted
Heritage Suite $32,000 Large lounge area, separate bedroom with double bed, single bed in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe, drawers, and fridge. There is a private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Large forward and side facing windows with great views. Available
Additional fees

Landing Fees (per person in USD): $880.00pp

Includes:

Pre/Post cruise transfers, one night hotel accommodation in a twin share room (incl. dinner/breakfast), all on board ship accommodation with meals and all expedition shore excursions.

Excludes:

All items of a personal nature, laundry, drinks, gratuities. International/domestic flights, visas and travel insurance.

In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton - 11 Feb 2021 - Spirit of Enderby

Cabin Category Price USD Description Availablity
Main Deck $23,000 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private washbasin. Shared shower and toilet facilities nearby with other Main Deck cabins. These cabins have a porthole. Available
Superior $25,000 One bunk (one upper and one lower berth), writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Available
Superior Plus $28,300 Two lower berths, writing desk, wardrobe, and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. These cabins have windows. Available
Mini Suite $29,400 Separate bedroom with a double bed and a single bed or sofa in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe and drawers. Private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Mini Suites have windows. Waitlisted
Heritage Suite $32,000 Large lounge area, separate bedroom with double bed, single bed in the lounge, writing desk, wardrobe, drawers, and fridge. There is a private bathroom with shower, toilet and washbasin. Large forward and side facing windows with great views. Available
Additional fees

Landing Fees (per person in USD): $880.00pp

Includes:

Pre/Post cruise transfers, one night hotel accommodation in a twin share room (incl. dinner/breakfast), all on board ship accommodation with meals and all expedition shore excursions.

Excludes:

All items of a personal nature, laundry, drinks, gratuities. International/domestic flights, visas and travel insurance.

Trip Reports

Looking for a taste of what you can expect on our expeditions or want to relive your voyage? Our Trip Reports offer a detailed, day-by-day account of all of our previous expeditions tracking the voyage route and highlighting the numerous wildlife and cultural encounters experienced along the way.

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What out travelers are saying:

We want to thank you all as a team and as a group of totally - focussed individuals for all you have done to make our trip safe, memorable, and ecologically thought provoking. READ MORE
NITA & BOB
Some wonderful memories, I would not hesitate to recommend it to a friend. READ MORE
ROBERT
I've seen nature up close! The cleanest water! The most ice & snow ever! Seals! Penguins! Albatross! & all the others! Some amazing locations & swam in the water off a Subantarctic Islands! I fell in love with every island we went to. READ MORE
ISOBEL
Thank you for the excellent trip to South to Antarctica. The moment I was standing on the fast ice and an adult emperor penguin jumped up on to the ice close to me while the ship was in the background was really marvellous! READ MORE
GÖRAN
Nothing can compare with actually being there and seeing everything as it actually is. READ MORE
DOREEN
Absolute grandeur and uniqueness of Antarctica was made more memorable by the fantastic atmosphere and ambience of the journey. READ MORE
RUTH
How do you describe seeing one’s first Emperor or Orca, sailing beside an iceberg as big as a country and making contact with immortal legends? READ MORE
MAX
Thanks to Rodney and the lecturers for an amazing journey to a truly incredible part of the world. An experience not to be missed!! Having walked through the huts it is difficult to imagine how they managed to survive, sometimes for years on end. READ MORE
BRONWYN
This voyage was perfect and truly unforgettable for me and for many others and the reason for this was the weather and the crew and the organisation that Rodney and Julia so expertly put togther to make it so. READ MORE
BRUCE
I have to say that it was a life changing experience for me and I could not have had a better experience at this point in my life. READ MORE
MARGARET
Thank you to all of the team for making this "the trip of a lifetime". Every day was a new adventure shared with staff and passengers from a wide range of backgrounds but a shared interest in exploration and conservation. We feel very privileged to have visited places that most people can only dream of - standing in the Historic Huts certainly reinforced what hardy souls those early explorers m... READ MORE
MERLE AND TONY
Just wanted to post a message to say Thanks for the wonderful adventure down to the Ross Sea in January. It really was magical and a dream come true. The guides, crew, chefs and Rodney worked so hard to make the trip a success and I'll never forget the feeling when I stepped inside Shakelton's and Scott's Huts for the first time. Once again a huge Thank-you to the entire team at Heritage and ho... READ MORE
LYNN
Back in the UK after a fantastic January trip to the Ross Sea. This was my 2nd trip down there and once again it was absolutely brilliant, many thanks to Rodney and his great team, the Russian Crew (Max was awesome spotting whales!) and to all the ship-mates who made it a memorable trip. READ MORE
BRIAN
I thought the staff was very helpful and knowledgeable. Every effort was made to comply with the itinerary, weather not with standing! I especially enjoyed the lectures which I thought were very professional and I learnt a lot. Areas where I thought you could make improvements were more grab rails in the dining and bar facilities to prevent accidents in rough weather. Cooks and staff did a wond... READ MORE
JULIE
An adventure to truly remarkable and beautiful places. The forest and mega herbs of the subantarctic islands were unexpected and stunning. It felt like time travel to see the historic huts of Ross Island and the present day bases. The Southern Ocean lived up to its reputation - roaring forties, furious fifties, screaming sixties, but NOT the silent seventies; this is where the adventure had mos... READ MORE
MARION
With the help of the expedition log that was written by David I made a very beautiful photo text book about the trip and it still lies at my coffee table and is regularly viewed by friends and family every time they visit. READ MORE
FRANK
Hi guys, I just wanted to say thank you so much for such a fantastic expedition we experienced in the Southern Ocean. The sites, especially the huts, are quite moving and just so humbling to actually be there. The restoration that has been done is incredible. And having the extensive knowledge of the Duke is unsurpassed. I am still watching back the videos of his explanations in the huts. ... READ MORE
PAUL (TRAVELLED 2014)
Hi guys, I just wanted to say thank you so much for such a fantastic expedition we experienced in the Southern Ocean. The sites, especially the huts, are quite moving and just so humbling to actually be there. The restoration that has been done is incredible. And having the extensive knowledge of the Duke is unsurpassed. I am still watching back the videos of his explanations in the huts. ... READ MORE
PAUL
I can't express enough thanks to Heritage for providing a Wonderful, Wonderful Trip. Well organised. The Staff, including the Galley Team (Great Food) and Russia Crew, were so 'User Friendly;. A Must, Must do trip. READ MORE
WILLIE
I have been home a week now from my expedition "In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton voyage" from the February 8th voyage. I had a fantastic time and thoroughly enjoyed the experience. There were several highlights, overall the calm seas and the great weather that was put on; the time saved because we were able to do the Ross sea in just a couple of days enabled us to sail to the Balleny Isla... READ MORE
ROBIN
We truly believe you guys are one of the best travel companies we have ever dealt with regards to what places you go, what you offer in the expedition, your values and ethos, the quality of the ship, and above all else, the exceptional professionalism, experience, humour and quality of the staff. READ MORE
BEN AND ROS
I travelled on the “Ross Sea Antarctic Cruising: In the Wake of Scott & Shackleton” expedition in Feb 2017 and can’t speak highly enough of the experience I had. Our Expedition Leader, Samuel, was exceptional. His open, clear communication, vast knowledge of the areas we went to and good humor at all times made for a wonderful trip. The other staff were equally as good. Having staff aboard that... READ MORE
BRENT PIZZATO
We had such a wondrous time on the ship...still reeling from it all, it was just fabulous and the thousands of penguins we saw were just amazing and exceeded all our expectations!!! Four new species for us seen was just amazing...Snares, Royals, SIX EMPERORS and an erect crested!!! We were in penguin heaven!!! We've now seen 15 of the 18 penguins in the wild!!!! So thanks to wonderful Heritage ... READ MORE
JULIE AND TIM
I enjoyed the Akademik Shokalskiy very much because of the placement of my cabin. I saw everyone who passed onto the 4th deck and went up & down the stairs. The guides were excellent, giving us well researched lectures and from the documen-taries I learned a lot. I saw my 17th penguin species - the Emperor - so my bucket list is complete. Connor and Mat's cooking was superb! For my age of ... READ MORE
DOTTIE MAYNARD
...Your combined knowledge and skills was outstanding and inspiring. Don, treading the fine line between people's expectations and providing safe, rewarding experiences must at times be difficult but you did it with ease and we both had so many breathtaking, awe-inspiring experiences in expedition mode. I had done a bit of reading to prepare for this trip, but your words, from each of you a... READ MORE
KELSEY
I am so sorry it has taken me this long to write to you all and thank you for the most extraordinary experience of my life. I traveled with Samuel, Agnes, Helen, David, Andrew, Connor, Matt and Dr Pat and Leanne of course, to the Ross Sea back in February this year. My husband James and our friends (it was their honeymoon) have not stopped talking about our time on board the Akademik Shokalsky... READ MORE
KATHLEEN
In the safe hands of expedition leader Rodney and ship captain Dimitri, The Spirit of Enderby took us on a journey of a lifetime. The adventure of crossing the notorious southern ocean, the remarkable history and huts of the 'heroic age' explorers, the mesmerising wildlife encounters, the scenic snow clad mountains of the Antarctic continent, Mount Erebus and the Ross ice shelf. This trip is ... READ MORE
STACEY LETHLEAN

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In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton

➞ View all In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton posts

21 Mar 2019
The recent 'In the Wake of Scott and Shackleton' #1972 expedition aboard 'Spirit of Enderby' has concluded. The Species List for this voyage is now...READ MORE
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